What is a Press Kit and Why do you need one?

press kit contents

What is a press kit and why do you need one?

Press kits, also referred to as media kits are useful for businesses of all sizes. What once started out as a response to the media’s request for a “press kit,” a packet of information about a company or a product, has morphed into a product that any business can use to support their mission.

Items commonly included in a media kit (in the order in which you’d want to display them:

Cover page – the first impression – so keep it simple and useful. Why the package is important, to whom it should be most useful, contact information for the follow-up point person, some type of table of contents of what is included behind this cover page. You can vary these each use. For example, networking events provide a wide range of opportunities to be seen.

A new product or service release – if there is a new product or service being introduced, this is the place to put it. The first page behind the cover – with details, photos, descriptions of the features and benefits of your new offering. Is it possible to include a sample, a coupon for a purchase or discount? Any fact sheets and specs would also go here. Absent a new launch your second page would be a comprehensive business info page. The who, what when, where why and how of clients that should be looking for you.

Corporate or business info page – This is the company overview. What your company does, when it was started. Unique information that might encourage the viewer to dig deeper or ask questions

Press Release or published article – have others already talked about you? Put that information here since a non-employee, non internal marketing piece is stronger than any pitch you can present. But go ahead and include your own press release to guide prospects and the media in the direction you want to be known for.

FAQ sheets – go ahead and create or compile those frequently asked questions which can help guide interviewers and prospects toward your mission, goals and objectives as well as commonly encountered feedback

Call to Action – is it an order form, a time driven promotion. Is it a request for the media to attend a launch, a lunch or a presentation. Whatever it is, make sure it is clear about the purpose and value to the recipient

Many times we are asked to create a custom logo pocket folder that all this information goes into and in those cases we recommend a pocket for the folder with a slot for your business card. You can be as plain or as fancy as budget and time constraints dictate but as a package the media kit should stand out and be viewed as a one stop – total resource – about you, for your recipient.

Press Kit created at Kendall Press of Boston and Cambridge

What about digital kit requests?

With everyone online, many people ask us how to handle requests for electronic versions of these kits and what, if anything, should be different about them. Check in next week for some answers or subscribe to our articles to get notified about our next post.

Keith Spiro for the team at Kendall Press

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